Rob Challis – 3AM Tears (Single Review)

With inspirations taken from Ella Henderson, Adele and Sam Smith, Rob Challis has been causing quite a stir with his honest music. Having supported artists such as Quill & Bev Bevan, and playing numerous festivals, Rob’s journey so far has constantly progressed and he’s still just at the beginning. His latest single; “3am Tears” was released over a month ago and the reception it’s had is fantastic, as it should. 

3am Tears deals with the struggle of a failed relationship. Heartbreak is felt throughout the song and heartstrings are seriously pulled to create sympathy for Rob. The one word that I can describe this song has to be REAL. We all go through it in someway, and heartbreak is not pretty. Pulling yourself together and reassuring yourself is the only way you can get through it, and in Rob’s case, he wrote a song to deal with it. It just so happens that the song is beautiful. The simplicity of the rhythm and melody is captivating and really draws you in. As Rob’s pleads his way through the song while playing piano and singing, the other instruments really brings the song a fresh light. In the darkest of times, we always find the light, it may sound cheesy but it’s true and for Rob, his light is his music. The song is loose and the bareness of it really draws attention to the band. The moodiness of the song is oozing emotions everywhere, in the lyrics, guitars, drums, piano, literally everything. Knowing Rob personally, I have to say that he seriously lives for this stuff and there’s nothing else on this planet that makes him happier than writing songs. His honesty and belief in things will enchant you along his journey. Keep your eye on Rob as he will be releasing his debut EP very soon. In the meantime, go listen to his previous single Enjoy Your Joywhich is about a traumatic experience Rob personally went through.

With the clock ticking so fast before we know it, we’ve been listening to this song on repeat until 3am… 

Score: 4/5

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https://www.facebook.com/ChallisRobert/

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Crosslight – Road to Recovery (Review)

Distorted guitars, harsh bass lines and drum patterns, Crosslight‘s music is full of angst. The band formed in early 2016 and have already toured around the UK. As well as playing shows, the band have spent a lot of time in the studio recording their debut album “Road to Recovery.”  The album was released on the 6th May 2018, and I’m finally getting round to sitting down and reviewing it. Crosslight are energetic and so passionate about their work and it completely shines through every word and chord. Their live shows showcase their talent to audiences through the ages and it certainly leaves people wanting more. The band consists of

The first track, “Recovery” begins with what sounds like a heart monitor in a hospital, sneakily involving the background noise of a waiting room. Before we know it, the song transitions into track number two; “Run Into Flowers.” This song has had a really good reception so far from fans with reaching over 1,000 plays on Spotify. Lead singer, Charlotte’s voice compliments the song also sounding heavily influenced from Hayley Williams of Paramore. Musically, the track is fast and upbeat, giving the album a good start off. Hopefully the momentum sticks all the way throughout. I find the guitar tone slightly a bit generic and not very creative for a pop metal song, but it still suits the song well. If you’re a fan of the nu-metal scene in the noughties, you probably will like this track.

“Clockwork” tells the story of what feels like a battle with a mental illness with this lyric indicating the struggle; “I’ve had enough, I’ll rid the curse be normal again.” Metal is hard to not fall into the category of sounding all the same because of its aggresion and similar rhythmical guitar patterns, but Charlotte really draws you in to listen to the story. I feel that the repetition of this track makes it actually more original.

The fourth track on the album, “Time Wasted” is a bit more electronic to begin with, adding another influence into Crosslight’s inspirations. It’s a short song which adds strength to embark on the next song “Karma.” Now, this song is heavy and deals with angst from, well, karma. What goes around comes around honey, we’ve all gone through it, wherever we’re watching someone go through karma or going through it ourselves. I find that the song itself has the same attitude of shrugging your shoulders, it’s simply put as a care free nature of “Whatever!” The chorus lyrics aren’t quite the normal, metal lyrics you’d get, it’s more of an Avril Lavigne tone which is really different. “You run around oh so careless honey, karma’s gonna catch up soon, I’m done with you.” The rhythm is slightly different compared to the other tracks on the album, but it still has a similar vibe to it all. Strongest track on he album so far for me.

“Fighting for What? falls into the same attitude as everything else so far, and as a listener, I’m longing for another influence in the band’s music to make it slightly more original. The drums are so programmed which makes the song feel forced. I think the band were definitely aiming towards an angry, powerful album instead of the music actually being more felt, which is definitely not a negative thing, it’s just a personal preference. I really admire the band for striving for something and getting the product done the way they wanted it.

Overdriven bass played by Daniel begins the next song “Poison” which creates a tone that Chris Wolstenholme defines in Muse. I feel that the song doesn’t dynamically go anywhere, it stays the same throughout. I’d really like to hear Charlotte sing different phrases/tones to make the songs slightly more interesting, but saying that, I do like the angry attitude in her voice. At the very end of the song, it’s really interesting how everything just completely stops and there’s just a slightly delay that comes after from Charlotte’s voice making it sound confusing as if there’s more to come, but there’s not… clever.

“100,000 Miles” begins with a ukulele which was very unexpected seeing as the album is so angry. The song does have a rhythmical metal sounding guitar part by Luke come swiftly in after the first verse, making the band go back to their roots. I think the band tried to make this a folk-metal track with the soft string instruments sitting in the back, but it doesn’t work as well as planned I personally think. I’ve noticed that in most of the songs on the album, it feels very stiff and mixed to the grid making it sound somewhat robotic. This is used a-lot in heavy metal music as it does add more power to the songs.

A heavy prog-esque riff dominates “Submerge” and automatically I thought to myself “this is more like it.” The tone is scary and makes you instantly want to move in someway, wherever it may be a foot twitch or a head bang. The guitar tone sounds similar to the sound that Queens of the Stone Age implicated on Songs for the Deaf, which is always a great compliment. I like how the band bring their own flavouring to this prog based song. It’s definitely my favourite on the album for sure.

“Just a Kiss” features Amal Birch, a freestyle rap artist. The song definitely has an influence of what Jay Z captured with 99 Problems; the rap rock element. The rap itself from Amal feels a bit too fixed and I really wish it was a bit more loose. The words are really well thought out though and fit the topic well. With the programmed drums, it’s just not quite as powerful as this song should be. I could be completely wrong about the drums being programmed, but the mix sounds like they have been edited quite a lot. I’m sure this song live will be really great to listen to with drummer, Joe, laying down some juicy drum fills. I feel that the topic of the track is about simply having a kiss with someone in, maybe a club, well that’s what it sounds like.

Once again, the next song doesn’t really go anywhere, and sometimes when that happens, it doesn’t take me to a place. Whereas songs that have a strong momentum all the way through, it makes people shift to another place where they can really relate to the song. Saying that, in “B.A.C.K”, you can feel the energy that the band bring in their music, they really do live for this stuff. One thing that people look for in new bands are charisma, talent & passion, Crosslight certainly do have that.

The guitars in “Kingdom is Mine” aren’t quite quantised to the same tempo as the drums in some parts making the guitars sound unfinished and sort of out of time. This song is once again nu-metal down to a tee. I feel the influences behind this song are Halestorm and Evanescence with all three bands having a strong female vocal. I like the path that the band go down with their music but like I’ve said before, it’s not really my personal preference to listen too.

Next up is actually an acoustic number, Charlotte sings “Drive On” with an American twang making it show that her voice is versatile and can sing through genres. This folk number feels slightly forced still and the harsh drum editing is more obvious than before as this song is so soft. I feel that the cymbals being played, more a less constantly make the song sound a bit messy. Overall though, the song is sweet and is also the longest track on the whole album.

The last track on the album “I’m Not Done” isn’t really a stand out track as much as the last of an album should be. The song does cover the band’s genre as a whole and connects the songs altogether to fit a nice pattern for the album. If you’re a fan of My Chemical Romance, The Used, Tonight Alive, then you should definitely check Crosslight out.  The band cover a wide range of influences in their music and make them fresh. The songs are good and the talent shines. Interested to see where the band may take their music in their next releases…

Favourite Tracks: Recovery, Run Into Flowers, Clockwork, Time Wasted, Karma, Submerge.

Score: 6.5/10

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https://www.crosslight.band/

Meme Detroit & Institutes live at The Night Owl, Birmingham – 5th May 2018 (Review)

I went to see Meme Detroit with support from Institutes live on the 5th May at the Night Owl. I know both bands personally so it was nice to go and do a feature on both. Institutes brought their theatrical side out with the theme tune of the Avengers signalling their first track. Gareth’s vocals were constantly on point as each song progressed. I know Gaz personally, like I said, and I know how much he likes Star Wars, so I really wasn’t surprised to see a Star Wars mask on the stage while they played, just constantly staring into our souls. With their set featuring tracks like We See Colour which was aggressive, it was nice to hear tracks like Not Alone with the whole arrangement of the song being delicious. I must say, the bass line in the verses for this track is so fragile but delicate. Their stand out track for the show was Golden Egg with the lead guitar going through what seemed like a midi synthesiser pedal, the song had so much power. Top performance from the boys, will definitely be checking them out again for sure. 

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Whereas for Meme, the girl sure does bring attitude to every track the band plays. Meme released her debut album back in 2016 and has been causing quite a stir round the Birmingham music scene for quite a while. With influences drawn from 90’s grunge, 80’s synth pop and indie rock, Meme’s distorted music is big. Her live set included big songs “With You” featuring Love Transcends All Again, a real powerful love song about being in love with “love.” The band, of course, featured the latest release, Soc Med Junkies which is about social media as a whole and how it controls us. I must say, the songs are really quite good, but at the gig, some guitar parts were drowned so much in fuzz and distortion that it was hard to understand the songs fully. Saying that, the band as a whole (Barney Such on Drums) and Ross Adams on bass) created an energy that filled the whole room. Just a shame that I had to leave early.

I asked Meme some questions to get a better feel of what her music/influences involve.

“I was sat aimlessly scrolling one day through my news feeds and suddenly found myself feeling really heavy-hearted and down. I realised it was due to all the negative sh** that I was reading and watching on my screen. It was a bit of a light bulb, “what the f*** am I doing?” moment so I switched off my phone, grabbed my guitar and notebook and started writing to put my time to a much happier/more positive activity.”

 

“Thanks! Yeah, the 80s thing came from a composition briefing for a film soundtrack. I’d never really done anything like that before so decided to give it a go and ended up really liking what came out. So much so, we released it. Influence wise, it’s hard to say as my influences range from all sorts. Due to my family’s generational hand me down box of vinyls: Bands/artists such as The Beatles, Bowie, Bob Marley, MJ, Foo Fighters, to At the drive in, Radiohead, Smashing Pumpkins, Death from above. I’m well into dance and old skool hip hop also. If something stirs an emotion in me, whatever the genre, I’ll dig it. Guitar writing wise, however, I guess I could probably say my biggest influences are Radiohead’s Jonny Greenwood, Billy Corgan and although she’s a bassist, Pixies’ Kim Deal’s simplistic yet genius playing style inspired me from a very young age.”

 

What has been your favourite gig you’ve played so far? What’s the weirdest gig you’ve played?
“My favourite gig so far has to be when we played the main stage at Silverstone.
It was just an awesome buzzing atmosphere. The Sun was setting in the distance and in that moment as we were playing out, it just felt so right. It was almost like an out-of-body experience ha. The weirdest gig I’ve played is probably The Treehouse sessions in Birmingham. I wasn’t sure what to expect as when you get there, you have to go through someone’s house and you get taken into the back garden. You go through this wooden door at the bottom of the garden (it was like Narnia!) and suddenly you’re in this full on production room with monitor screens and crew everywhere. Then you get taken through to the performance area and it’s literally a tiny treehouse with a gorgeous intimate seating area & bar below for the audience. The whole thing was filmed for their channel with an interview that took place in this ace yurt. It actually ended up being more awesome than weird in the end!”

The Garage Flowers – Crashing The Party (Single Review)

London-based band, The Garage Flowers are a typical bad boy, dirty rock and roll band. The energy they create in their songs is unbelievable and reminds of what The Rolling Stones would have sounded like if they took their music down the slightly heavier guitar tone route. The Garage Flowers fan base is forever gaining with thousands of followers on their social media sites, and with their latest single, I’m not surprised. They’ve certainly gained a new fan in myself.

Crashing the Party is a real indie number that would definitely make anyone tap their foot too. The band have elements of brit pop in their music, and I can definitely hear Pulp in this song. It’s a fun, witty, indie number that will definitely go down well at any gig for sure. The catchy tune has got over a 1,500 views on YouTube in 2 months. The song was produced by Paul Tipler (The Horrors, Carl Barat, Squeeze), so no wonder the production is clear and features the essence of a great dance track. If you’re ever in the neck of the woods that The Garage Flowers are in, go crash their party and have a fun-filled night of laughter and music.

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Score: 3/5

Quill – Grey Goose Call (EP Review)

Quill are not only known for their unique musical style… they create a musical journey through the ages with their live set up. After listening to Grey Goose Call, it’s now a fact that they create the same energetic live essence throughout the studio recording. They sit comfortably within the celtic folk/rock genre and it’s safe to say, the latest line up have brought a fresh new sound to their music. With Grey Goose Call written by the band themselves, the 4 songs take us into a dark, but warming entrance to what feels like a new beginning.

The title track of the EP begins with a gentle goose calling, before strong harmonies that really remind of Fleetwood Mac’s tone’s enter. The band have adapted to their influences through time, but made sure their sound becomes so fresh to listen to. For a 6:12 minutes long song, it captivates you all the way through. As the song dynamically builds, the sound becomes quite diverse and intricate. The bass comfortably sits in the mix, but you can constantly hear the pulse repeating. I must say, the production is really intense and in your face with elements of Fairport Convention shining through. Having string instruments gives the song a complete different style. I personally feel if the strings weren’t in this track, it would sound more like a pop orientated track. Joy’s emotional vocals tell the story of simply hearing the “Grey Goose Call.” Maybe the goose is a symbolic structure of something? It could be a metaphor for a cry for help. In my opinion, the percussion and drums replicates the simplicity of the song, but by making it sound complex. The rhythm makes it sound kind of African and upbeat. This is a very strong song to set the bar quite high for what sounds like a warming welcome to the sound of Quill. The song ends just as it begins, indicating that yes, this is end, but it’s certainly not over yet.

“Elephant in the Room” begins with footsteps creeping up into a simple 4/4 beat. The guitars sound heavily influenced by old progressive rock tones, similar to bands like Genesis. Quill take a simple blues sounding song and subtle add tasty melodic guitar lines over the top, making it an extremely versatile song. The chorus is moody and has the ability to haunt anyone with the harmonies generating new, elegant parts throughout. An elephant in the room is a metaphor for an obvious problem in a room basically, and I really like how Quill can take a personal matter but make the problem not known. It leaves the audience asking “what is the actual problem?” Questioning an audience is a good thing in my opinion, because they are wanting to know more about your music, indicating them to keep on listening. I love how this song isn’t rushed and is played to indicate an emotion of love. When the instruments are all cut out to just the drums, it makes me feel that anything could happen next. The drums completely stop to just Joy singing “elephant in the room” which end with a subtle breath like sigh making the audience realise that after all this time, the actual problem and the elephant in the room, was simply the singer.

The subtly comes through this song with Joy’s vocals sounding exceptionally emotional. Having someone’s affection is the most warming feeling in the world and I really like how Quill have managed to replicate this feeling through “Skin on Skin.” This song is moody in the essence that it really grips you to hold onto every part of the song. All of the members of Quill have had a memorable history in music and I really like how they bring all their stories into one, creating a really big influence to their fans. This song would really be a lovely wedding dance for a couple, as the comfort of the song is so calming. There’s genuinely no negativity shining in this song, making it really a big moment on the EP. Dynamically, the song doesn’t build as much as the others on the EP, but it works so well to keep such a calming momentum.

The last track on the EP is a fist pump for wanting love. The whole EP is situated round love and the different aspects that you want. We have Skin on Skin which is the comfort of affection, whereas the vibe I’m getting from “Little Affection” is needing to be loved. It’s the longest track on the EP and it constantly builds with influences of world music being mirrored constantly. The rhythm of the song just makes you tap your feet and really dive into the music. “I forgotten what it felt like to fall in love” takes us into a new element of the song; really needing this love otherwise things could fall apart. I personally feel that the singer is needing this love to carry on, it’s her well-being and soul on the line, if she doesn’t get this love, something bad could happen. It makes me think; what is she actually in love with? could it be being in love with the meaning of love? a friend? a piece of music? It could be anything, which makes me like this a whole lot more. The sense of not knowing what the topic is throughout the EP makes me drawn to Quill’s music more. We never really know what the actual concept Joy is singing about which is great, we’re just left with the topic of love. This track is one that the whole band wrote together which strangely enough, makes the song so much bigger than the others on the track. It’s definitely the stand out, rock ballad of the EP. It’s proggy in the aspect that the concept is here, there and everywhere.

As a whole, the EP is truly wonderful. I’m lucky enough to be supporting Quill on the 8th June at the Artrix Theatre in Bromsgrove.

The musicians on the album consist of Joy Strachan-Brain on vocals, Kate McWilliam on violin and backing vocals, Abby Brant on keyboards and backing vocals, Tony Kelsey on guitars and backing vocals, Matt Worley on bass and backing vocals, Andy Edwards on the drums and the ELO legend, Bev Bevan on percussion… we now realise the secret behind Quill’s full sound, the extremely talented musicians behind the songs. 

Favourite Tracks: Elephant in the Room, Skin on Skin, Little Affection
Score: 7.5/10

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http://www.quilluk.com/

 

Junior Weeb, Coat of Many & Dan James Griffin live at The Copcut Elm, Droitwich – 11th May 2018 (Review)

As part of this review, I wanted to say a bit about Kidderminster College. I’ve been studying at Kidderminster College for 4 years now and my time is up in June. I’ve met some amazing musicians on the way who have turned into great friends. On the 11th May, I went to the Copcut Elm to see 3 college acts play a gig and even though, I don’t go into college as much as I’d like anymore, the college itself is amazing as it brings us musicians together. Without college, I may never have known about these lovely people. 

First to take the stage was Dan James Griffin, I reviewed Dan’s album 4am last year which you can read here. Still to this day, Dan’s music just completely blows my mind. His technique and love for his instrument shines through every single performance he showcases. He uses such versatile, tight rhythms that creates this prog- math rock & hip hop vibe to his songs. His bright tone glows throughout all of his performances creating another level of music. As Dan is more of an “online” artist, it’s always an honour to see him live and it’s definitely something you don’t want to miss. I must say though, the PA that was used for this event wasn’t suited for the pub as such and wasn’t as powerful as hoped, but each artist dealt with the sound and managed to pull off a brilliant performance anyway.

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Next up on the evening were a newly formed band, Coat of Many, and I swear to god, each time I see them, they get better and better. The chemistry they all have on stage delivers to create this lovely warm pop sound. The group are mainly composed by two songwriters; Ellie & Theone. Ellie is known for writing deep, meaningful love songs and Theone explains her love for the world with reggae, blues and even soul numbers. The two girls and their musical talents radiate off each other which truly inspires the listeners. I love how the band will take things down to quite slow beat tracks but still hold the audience’s attention throughout each song, whether it’s slow or fast tempo. The band as a whole have this charisma that every artist should inspire to have and my goodness, they sure do love what they do. As do the listeners. 

https://www.facebook.com/CoatOfMany/
https://www.instagram.com/coatofmanyuk/

The headline band of the night were the insanely talented, Junior Weeb. The band from Droitwich brought in a great crowd for the whole of the night which was so amazing to see people listen to mainly originals all night and enjoy it in a pub! The boys create a 90’s grunge, indie-funk sound with their music drawing inspirations from, what sounds like Sonic Youth, Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, Wolf Alice to name a few. The rhythm section: Max Killing (bass) and Quentin Hill (drums) deliver a solid effort throughout their performances with adding small fills that sound heavily influenced by jazz fusion artists; Weather Report. It was the first night I had seen Junior Weeb play in a while and they have improved so much to tighter their craft and deliverance. The inspirations from their performance were truly breathtaking with even them covering an old instrumental song “Sleep Walk” by Santo & Johnny. This song saw Joe (lead guitar) and Max (bass) switch instruments, Joe took to bass and Max played a lap steel guitar. It was really nice to see the boys play something different for the audience to hear and it surely made them stand out even more. 

https://www.facebook.com/juniorweebband/
https://www.instagram.com/juniorweeb_/
https://soundcloud.com/juniorweeb

As a whole, the night was oozing with talent and I’m so proud to have these musicians as not only contacts but also friends. Do check out their music, you won’t be disappointed. 

Jeff Buckley – Grace (Review)

In my eyes, “Grace” is the best album of all time. Without Grace, my life would be so much more different to how it is now. When I first found Jeff Buckley’s music, it turned my life completely around and made me realise how much music means to me. It really opened my eyes to how much I want a career in music. There’s not really a day that goes by when I don’t listen to at least one song off Grace. Jeff has been my biggest inspiration in songwriting for about 4 years now and there’s so many things that I would have loved to ask him. He left this world far too soon and there will never be another artist like him.

“Mojo Pin” starts with angelic vocals from Jeff which makes us feel that this could be a perfectly soft song. When the percussion is slowly but surely added, the tension starts rising to make the audience believe “hey… this isn’t going to be soft at all, is it?” The lyrics explain a feeling of addiction, to either drugs or a person. Jeff also indicated once that the song was about a dream he had about a black woman. He also apparently invented the term “Mojo Pin” which makes it clear that it’s when you inject drugs into your arm. I feel if anxiety or even bipolar had a sound, it would be this song. The dynamics are constantly shifting up and down, whereas the vocals gradually build all the way through to the end with this refreshing power from Jeff. I personally feel that the song could be took in an unusual way too, perhaps Jeff was actually addicted to a person? He definitely wasn’t a drug addict or alcoholic, if he was ever addicted to something, it would have been love or music. As the song proceeds, it builds up making it sound that Jeff was getting frustrated with love for this woman. For such a gentle start to the album, Mojo Pin is simply put as an iconic song for Jeff. It showcases that he could be so soft and caring, but really show he meant business when he screamed of his pain at the same time.

I’ve always loved the imperfections of Jeff’s work, he never aimed to have things perfectly in time or sang correctly, he just performed the music to how it should be done, by felt. After the second chorus, a free, messy, jazz-fusion jam enters that’s totally unexpected but without it, the song wouldn’t have that tension yearning for release. As the jam comes to an end, we’re comforted by Jeff’s angelic vocals, singing a soft, melodic line that just sends shivers down my spine. Through Mojo Pin, it’s Jeff’s voice that just stuns the whole performance to make it such an amazing start to a debut album. The use of drug imagery in this song is so delicate and painful that it makes the audience feel like we’re on drugs too. Jeff’s love for this woman makes us feel that Jeff felt his problems would go away if he had love in his life. The change of rhythm from mid-beat to upbeat could prove more of his frustration for love. “The white horses flow, memories fire, the rhythms fall slow, black beauty I love you so” is a much deeper lyric than it sounds. White horse is another name for Heroin, Heroin affects your “memories”, and makes your heart beat slow. Plus black beauty is another word for speed. Like I said, his imagery of drugs is painfully amazing. It’s dark, twisted & stunning.

The title track, “Grace” was originally an instrumental song written by Gary Lucas and Jeff added the vocal melody and lyrics. The song begins with a complex guitar hook that’s memorable and is all about the rhythm more than the notes. It twinkles brightly and gives across a romantic vibe that makes you long for love too. The song is in the key of E minor, but uses chords that aren’t found in that scale, which makes the song sound hard to recognise what key it is actually in. Jeff wrote the lyrics inspired by saying goodbye to his girlfriend at an airport in the rain. The song is more about not feeling bad about yourself when you have true love by your side. Grace is about keeping alive and staying true to yourself even when you feel things may be going bad. Grace was the first Jeff Buckley song I ever listened too and it holds a very special place in my heart. “There’s the moon asking to stay” is terribly sad, as asking to stay could imply that death is sometimes closer than we think. “Long enough for the clouds to fly me away” indicates flying away to heaven. You could say that Jeff turned a negative feeling into a positive healing. “Well it’s my time coming, I’m not afraid, afraid to die”… I really hope that lyric was true.

In the second verse, Jeff’s guitar is in counterpoint with his lyrics “but she cries to the clicking of time, oh time” to add effect to the clicking of time. Another great thing about Jeff was that he was so intelligent too, he knew exactly how he wanted his songs to sound. Later in the song, it seems that he’s singing about drowning: “I feel them drown my name, so easy to know and forget with this kiss, I’m not afraid to go, but it goes so slow.” This is so upsetting, as that’s the way Jeff left us. The choruses famous “wait in the fire” is linked to a Sufi idea which isn’t surprising as Jeff loved Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan. The Sufi’s often said that their love for God is like a fire that cleanses the soul. I must say that the vocal power in Grace is the one thing that just leaves me speechless every time I hear it. Jeff literally just screamed this one note for over 10 seconds, ending the vocal phrase with an even higher note. It showcases that he really was one of the best vocalists of all time with his range just frying my brain. The instrumentation of the song keeps the same chilling emotion throughout with the instruments sometimes making inhumane noises that sound like things that might linger in hell. I completely love the message that Jeff gave with this song. What’s the point in feeling scared of death? We know we will all become of it one day, but we’re living right now. Live here, in this moment, don’t long for death, because it will come eventually.

“Last Goodbye” starts with what sounds like it’s going to be a heavy, country rock song. The bass line plays what could be a vocal line or potentially a riff, but before to long, the drums indicate a new section of the song featuring a more acoustic chilled vibe before taking it back to the bass riff. When the song starts properly after the interesting introduction, it’s slightly less interesting to what we would have hoped for. The song is about a man who’s in love with a woman but still breaks things off with her for no reason at all, possibly feeling that he isn’t up to her expectations. I feel with the orchestral instruments on this song, it makes it sound like something that Page and Plant would have performed on their 1994 No Quarter tour. It’s a stunning arrangement, but it doesn’t feel as big as the first two songs on the album. It’s a love ballad prominently, Jeff definitely did have a lot of emotions to get out about love, which makes me feel sad, maybe he took most of it to the grave? The song features segments throughout of hard rock layers that causes more tension for the song. I really like how this song doesn’t really have a chorus, it just has the main hook line, which is short, sweet but still memorable. Overall, the song deals with feeling good about a break up but slowly regretting it.

The next track is the first of the three covers on Grace, “Lilac Wine.” Written by James Shelton, Jeff’s version is drowned in a delicious reverb that doesn’t have a strong delay to it either. It’s spacious, stunning and free. The lyrics are kindled around heartache of losing a lover and taking to drinking wine made from a lilac tree. It’s a mellow, pop ballad that completely drifts you off to another planet. I love the short silences in this song which creates a dynamic, tensed shift. Jeff certainly made everything his own. If you haven’t heard already, he did a cover of an old jazz song called Strange Fruit and it’s completely mesmerizing.

An elegant, guitar sequence is played at the beginning of “So Real” and then falls into a minor chord indicating the entrance to the first verse. So Real is a personal favourite of mine as it takes you through a dark mellow rollercoaster of isolation and love. This song could be the aftermath of Last Goodbye (the break up) and now living with the regret of ending a relationship that was actually good. “And I couldn’t awake from this nightmare, it sucked me in and pulled me under” is a horrific lyric about being fearful of drowning. Jeff Buckley fans always find it hard to listen to certain lyrics and that’s definitely one of them. As we get to the half way mark of the song, we get to a section that’s so scary. Jeff had a few songs in with sections that sounded exactly like monsters stalking earth for their prey.

I completely believe that with this song in particular, you have to be in a mind-set to listen to it to fully understand it. One time, I listened to the scary section and wasn’t in a listening mindset and ended up hearing a lawn mower which ruined that part for me for a short while. What I’m trying to say is, give that section a chance, you’ll even be petrified of it or find it funny, there’s not really an in-between. As the section comes to a close, everything goes silent, before Jeff enters with “I love you, but I’m afraid to love you.” The instruments start again but slightly slower than before, but the pace gradually picks up again. The song is truly stunning, the instrumentation is beautiful, but with the lyrics as a combination, it becomes a cry for help. The lyrics and music compliment each other so nicely that it leaves you completely stunned of what’s just happened after listening to it. Jeff’s vocal performance towards the end of the song becomes so historic that it leaves me with goosebumps every time I hear it. The song is completely real and the atmosphere brought to it is nerve-wracking. It’s lonely and isolated to the point where it makes you feel uneasy when listening to it alone. Jeff’s vocal ability always managed to reassure the listeners that everything’s going to be ok.

The most famous track in Jeff’s discography just happens to be a cover and the most beautiful cover to ever be released? It could well be. The sigh at the beginning of “Hallelujah” is so powerful yet so questionable. Why’s it there for? To mark a hard song is ahead? Possibly. That’s one thing that will be left untold. The song was written by Leonard Cohen who passed away in 2016, and it’s about a love which has gone stale and out of date. Cohen used a lot of religious imagery, referring to the bible. It also refers to how this woman is in charge of her man and that he can’t take control because of her feminine features. The whole performance by Jeff is purely electric guitar and vocals, it sure does keep you captivated the whole way through. The guitar work is intricate and states another argument… could Jeff Buckley have been one of the greatest guitarists to have ever lived too? He could well be. Before the last verse, Jeff takes us into an instrumental break before ending the song dynamically powerful. He didn’t scream the vocals, but he did shout a bit to get his message across before ending with his pure angelic vocals. The longest track on the album at 6:52, and it’s definitely not a track that you’ll be skipping anytime soon. Jeff’s version makes the song of praise into a yearning for acceptance track. It gives the same simplicity of Lilac Wine does, but this cover is so raw that it leaves you cold and wanting warmth by listening to it on repeat.

Jeff realised and finally understood, that his life was full of failed relationships. In “Lover, You Should’ve Come Over”, he recognised that he had been too immature in a relationship, but figured out the girl he broke up with could have actually been the “one.” The song is entered with what sounds like interference before an accordion plays an irish style folk melody or something that you’d hear in a church. I think that Grace could be took as a love, concept album that deals with the processes of love – love, heartbreak, immaturity, regret to name a few. The most precious thing about Jeff was his originality. There was no one like him before and there will never be anyone like him again. He had influences and inspirations obviously, from Led Zeppelin, Django Reinhardt, but he shined through with his own sound which inspired many people around the world and still does do this day. The song takes us through a long, hard battle as she didn’t come over like he wanted her too, but if she ever was too, he would have always welcomed her back in open arms. If he was still alive today and she came back, maybe that would have had a long, happy life together. It’s so upsetting and heartbreaking to think what if.

The song has been covered by Jamie Cullum, John Mayer and Matt Corby to name a few, who all have Jeff Buckley as a strong influence in their music, especially Matt Corby. I’d personally say that this song isn’t quite up there with all the others on the album, but it still is in its own league. It’s important on this album because it keeps the love process, concept, real. No matter what we go through, we all have heart-break eventually, maybe that’s not necessarily a relationship breaking up, it’s the loss of someone. I couldn’t imagine what Jeff’s family felt like when he unexpectedly passed away.

“Corpus Christi Carol” is the last cover on the album and it’s a hymn from 1504, which Jeff sings completely like an angel. Jeff once said that the song is about a fairytale about a falcon who takes the singers love to an orchard. The singer goes searching for her and arrives at a chamber where his love lies next to a knight who’s bleeding, with a tomb next to him with Christ’s body in it. It’s a pretty dark song that sounds so beautiful from Jeff’s vocals which is blinding us of what’s actually happening. The song is the shortest track on the album at 2:57 and critics have said before “What’s the point of it even being on here?” but without it, we wouldn’t have heard Jeff’s vocal range took to a whole new level. I’m sure if anyone else in the 1990’s took a hymn like this, recorded it and put it on their album, they wouldn’t have pulled it off, but because Jeff was always on his own level and didn’t ever care what others thought, he pulled it off brilliantly.

The second to last track on the album, “Eternal Life” has been said to be heavily inspired by Led Zeppelin, but Jeff had his own refreshing sound that still sounds new after over 20 years later. The song is mainly about anger and that life’s way to short to care about what others think of you, your colour, religious beliefs etc. We are all different, let’s just except that. You can take this song as a protest song to be honest, because Jeff stood up for what he believed in and believed that everyone was unique in their own way. The main lyric that stands out to me is “There’s no time for hatred, only questions, where is love? where is happiness? what is life? where is peace?” which indicates that the only thing we see in the media is fear. We never see the happy. Jeff tried to get the message across that people need to be asking the questions he stated. What is life? What is the purpose of life if there’s no love or happiness? Still to this day, that message is so important. I wish more people would listen to Jeff and especially this song to understand that yes, it’s ok to not be ok, but question yourself more about the things that you do.

It’s political, but not in the aspect that he’s saying “you should vote for this person” which I adore. I don’t really like when artists state who to vote for and who to like, when again, we all have our own opinions so let’s stick to them and not follow what others think. As the song is angry, I really love how Jeff and his band let rip and let loose in this song. It’s an iconic moment for the Grace album. This track is quite Nirvana esque too. 

The last track on what is the most important album to ever exist to me is “Dream Brother.” The guitar refrain is quite a simple melody that doesn’t sound as original as I hoped it would have been when I first heard it, but it’s still so effective. The song was written by Jeff, bassist Mick and drummer Matt, and it was written about a friend of theirs, Chris Dowd, urging him to not walk out on his girlfriend who was pregnant at the time (which Jeff’s dad Tim Buckley did to him.) The song is quite moody and is definitely the definition of a 90’s indie track. The song is quite experimental too and a strong one in Jeff’s small catalogue. I must say though, for it being the last track on the album, it doesn’t really give off a happy send off, but it definitely leaves you wanting more songs. Which we never really got or never will get… It’s a deep and meaningful album that leaves us wanting to know answers. Plus, it’s an emotional goodbye to the legend that is, Jeff Buckley.

Grace will always hold a special place in my heart, as will Jeff Buckley entirely. The album captivates me from start to finish every time I listen to it. Wanting more and knowing there will never be anymore, makes Grace more special.

We miss you Jeff, hope you’re taking it easy wherever you are.

(This review is of the original track listing – Forget Her was released in 2004 on the 10 year anniversary of Grace reissue.)
Favourite Tracks: Mojo Pin, Grace, Last Goodbye, Lilac Wine, So Real, Hallelujah, Eternal Life, Dream Brother.

Score: 10/10