GoldWater – Warpath (Single Review)

From their hometown of Leicester, the lads of GoldWater are known for their foot stomping music. Their latest single “Warpath” just cements that fact to be 100% true.

GoldWater Live Photo

The track is drowned with a blues structure, but it’s the big gospel vocals that situates the song with a natural hip hop essence. This essence definitely makes the band a bit out of their comfort zone but it’s always great to see artists explore different aspects of music. The song deals with a shrug of the shoulders like attitude that the heavy, distorted guitar riffs compliment really well. As a whole, I’m really liking the punch this song gives. I’m not a huge fan of the production as there are parts where I can hear what the singer’s exactly saying, but I think that’s definitely what the band wanted with this song. The song has a sense of confusion which just builds making it feel strange and if there’s a problem that hasn’t been solved in the story. I like this a lot as it leaves the audience asking questions. The band’s live shows cause quite a stir with their lead singer stomping through the crowd delivering the preach like lyrics and it’s great they include this factor in their studio work too. GoldWater are definitely a band that you don’t want to miss if you’re into psychedelic blues.

FACEBOOK:  www.facebook.com/goldwaterleicester

WEBSITE: www.goldwatermusic.com

MUSIC: www.goldwatermusic.bandcamp.com/releases

Score – 3.5/5

Advertisements

Tom Misch – Geography (Review)

Not many folk had heard of Tom Misch until his latest release, the timeless album “Geography”  back in April. I can already tell that in a decade or so, this album will simply be put as a “classic”, as the production, the songwriting, the talent is oozing with goodness out of every pour. Tom is only 23 years old and comes from England’s capital, London. Having skills as a producer as well a songwriter is really like having the world in the palm of your hand. He has the skills to record at any time as he can just do it all by himself and that’s the main thing I like about Tom. He’s signed to a record label, but he records, produces primarily on his own which has turned into 2,000,000 monthly listeners on Spotify, so he must be doing something good.

“Before Paris”  is the album opener and it’s simply introduced as a monologue from an interview that Roy Hargrove (jazz trumpeter) did. The song develops into a jazz-funk groove with quite a modern-pop guitar tone to keep it a refreshing feel. The whole production on this track is warming and a lovely start to an album. The monologue seems to be about someone who loves to do what they do as a career or even a hobby. It really mixes the album to make us believer that Tom loves what he does and that’s so humbling to know. The prominent part to me is how the drummer hits the snare repeatedly making it sound so tight and clean.

I’d read numerous descriptions for the next and they’ve been making me laugh so much. “Lost in Paris” makes you feel that it’s simply about a love that Tom lost in Paris but apparently, according to Tom himself on twitter, it’s about a hard drive that he, well, lost in paris. If this is true, it makes the song feel a bit more humorous and we can sympathise in a way because we’ve all lost something before. The amount of times I’ve lost my house keys is off the charts. Unlike this song which is still IN the charts! The melody is easy listening and suited for the warm weather we’re having at the moment in England. The tracks features Goldlink – a Washington DC Rapper. He adds a flavouring which makes the song suited for Rap/R’N’B lovers.

The track “South of the River” is filled with elements of pop, funk and r’n’b music with classical even being a strong influence with the string violins being a crucial part to the song. The vocal melody is memorable and pleasing to the ear. The way that Tom sings the lyrics are rhythmical, creating the catchy funk element. When we reach the solo, the instrument plays a jazz type scale introducing another influence for the song. As a whole, the lyrics are simple and the song subject is simple too, but the production and sound that the song delivers is really lovely. The fade out of the keyboard & guitar is mesmerizing, making the song sound like a dream. It’s diverse and the song compliments different decades because it sounds like a 70’s dance hit, an 80’s roller disco track, 90’s club anthem & a 00’s/10’s “banger” (as our youth say.)

Reminding me of 90’s R’n’B bands such as The Fugees, “Movie” is a mellow, relaxing composition that features spoken word at the beginning from Tom’s sister, Polly Misch. Tom really does have his own style which is so great to hear originality in this day and age. Tom has a very soft, calm voice which really compliments this song perfectly. The low frequencies on all the instruments are truly mesmerizing as it’s had to produce low sounds well into music without it sounding just like noise. What’s so amazing is that you can hear all of the instruments in their own limelight.

“Tick Tock” is filled with laid back vibes which reminds me of Bonobo ever so slightly at the beginning, then it develops into an upbeat, dance track. It’s warm sounding and gives a similar influence of “Make Luv” by Room 5 featuring Oliver Cheatham. The violins are featured in this track which makes it resemble “South of the River.” It’s always nice to have familiarity on an album of songs that truly stand out. For an instrumental, it really holds your attention. Sometimes we get lost and don’t stick with a song because a lot of use primarily listen to lyrics and vocal phrases, but this song catches you throughout.

De La Soul, the iconic hip hop band are featured on It Runs Through Me.” It’s quirky and clever how the lyrics “she told me add a bass line” is when the actual bass line of the song begins. This lyric is a hint towards “Add the Bassline” by Jordan Rakei who is one of Tom’s dearest friends and collaborators. This song has been hyped  up to be one of the best on the album, probably cause De La Soul are on it, but I feel it’s a bit repetitive and isn’t as interesting as all the other songs so far.

A jazzed up version of the soul hit “Isn’t She Lovely” by the legend Stevie Wonder is dreamy and very lo-fi. It’s layered with guitar parts over each other creating this bright tone. It’s the shortest track on the whole album, but still an important track on the album. Featuring a cover on an original album is really hard sometimes because people have their own expectation of a cover already (from the original.) Tom picked this song that’s covered by a lot of people too, which makes it even harder to compete with, but either way, he pulls it off and it’s a lovely, safe rendition of the track.

“Disco Yes” is a love song that seems like a relationship is going through a rough patch with the hook line being “i STILL love you,” leaves us as the audience thinking, are they together or not? If they’re not, they should be an item again because they’re still longing for one another. I feel the song dragged on a bit too much and should have ended a bit earlier as it feels like it out did it stay. This could be what Tom longed for with this track to make it seem that the relationship did go bad but then the happiness of the song is telling us that there’s still hope for the two lovers. I just feel it should have definitely gotten to the point a bit quicker than it did.

“Man Like You” is another cover. Originally done by Patrick Watson. Tom’s version is more of a Jeff Buckley approach where Jeff would take a cover song and transform it in his own way using his voice and guitar. Tom features ambient violins in the background which creates a spaced out atmosphere. Plus Tom sings this version in a lower register to how Patrick would do it. It’s a really great cover of an even greater song. A must listen on the album for sure.

Loyle Carner who’s a British rapper/spoken word artist features on “Water Baby.” The song deals with how bad things affect us, but if we don’t let it get to us, the grey will turn to sunshine. It’s a positive song but I feel it lacks something. The lyrics, rhythm’s and melodies are great, but I feel dynamically it stays the same all the way through, like a straight line that’s never-ending. I’d definitely like to hear subtle dynamic shifts in this for sure.

As much as I really like Tom’s voice, it always has the same tone in all of the songs on Geography and he uses the same phrases in “You’re on My Mind” too. It’s a true heart-felt ballad which doesn’t really go anywhere.  The chord changes are really nice though as well as the main drum beat. As a singer myself, I like to hear singers sing different verses differently as it captures the listeners even further. The guitar solo is very John Mayer-esque which I’m not surprises in the slightest as that’s one of Tom’s biggest musical influences. John Mayer is a sensational songwriter and guitarist who’s very underrated, just like Tom.

Heavily sampled by “So Hard to Find” by Pazazz is basically “Cos I Love You” in a nutshell. There’s not much to say really about this song. It didn’t grab my attention at all and I feel it sounds similar to everything else on the album. It really lacks originality. It’s forced to feel like everything else I should say. I do like how Tom heavily influenced a 70’s disco track and gave it a fresh new light but it’s cheesy and unnatural.

“We’ve Come So Far” is the last track on the album and it literally repeats “we’ve come so far” all the way through which gets annoying after a little while. The rhythm and harmonies make the song appeal more to my ears. Although I feel it’s not the best, it sends a warm, positive message across to the listeners making it a happy finish to a great album.

Favourite Tracks: Before Paris, Lost in Paris, South of the River, Movie, Tick Tock, Isn’t She Lovely, Man Like You

Score: 8/10

https://www.facebook.com/tommisch123/

https://tommisch.com/

Rob Challis – 3AM Tears (Single Review)

With inspirations taken from Ella Henderson, Adele and Sam Smith, Rob Challis has been causing quite a stir with his honest music. Having supported artists such as Quill & Bev Bevan, and playing numerous festivals, Rob’s journey so far has constantly progressed and he’s still just at the beginning. His latest single; “3am Tears” was released over a month ago and the reception it’s had is fantastic, as it should. 

3am Tears deals with the struggle of a failed relationship. Heartbreak is felt throughout the song and heartstrings are seriously pulled to create sympathy for Rob. The one word that I can describe this song has to be REAL. We all go through it in someway, and heartbreak is not pretty. Pulling yourself together and reassuring yourself is the only way you can get through it, and in Rob’s case, he wrote a song to deal with it. It just so happens that the song is beautiful. The simplicity of the rhythm and melody is captivating and really draws you in. As Rob’s pleads his way through the song while playing piano and singing, the other instruments really brings the song a fresh light. In the darkest of times, we always find the light, it may sound cheesy but it’s true and for Rob, his light is his music. The song is loose and the bareness of it really draws attention to the band. The moodiness of the song is oozing emotions everywhere, in the lyrics, guitars, drums, piano, literally everything. Knowing Rob personally, I have to say that he seriously lives for this stuff and there’s nothing else on this planet that makes him happier than writing songs. His honesty and belief in things will enchant you along his journey. Keep your eye on Rob as he will be releasing his debut EP very soon. In the meantime, go listen to his previous single Enjoy Your Joywhich is about a traumatic experience Rob personally went through.

With the clock ticking so fast before we know it, we’ve been listening to this song on repeat until 3am… 

Score: 4/5

https://www.instagram.com/challisrobert/

https://www.facebook.com/ChallisRobert/

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3-6t_Fj6EBxWuy5sSUjK5Q

https://robchallis.com/

Crosslight – Road to Recovery (Review)

Distorted guitars, harsh bass lines and drum patterns, Crosslight‘s music is full of angst. The band formed in early 2016 and have already toured around the UK. As well as playing shows, the band have spent a lot of time in the studio recording their debut album “Road to Recovery.”  The album was released on the 6th May 2018, and I’m finally getting round to sitting down and reviewing it. Crosslight are energetic and so passionate about their work and it completely shines through every word and chord. Their live shows showcase their talent to audiences through the ages and it certainly leaves people wanting more. The band consists of

The first track, “Recovery” begins with what sounds like a heart monitor in a hospital, sneakily involving the background noise of a waiting room. Before we know it, the song transitions into track number two; “Run Into Flowers.” This song has had a really good reception so far from fans with reaching over 1,000 plays on Spotify. Lead singer, Charlotte’s voice compliments the song also sounding heavily influenced from Hayley Williams of Paramore. Musically, the track is fast and upbeat, giving the album a good start off. Hopefully the momentum sticks all the way throughout. I find the guitar tone slightly a bit generic and not very creative for a pop metal song, but it still suits the song well. If you’re a fan of the nu-metal scene in the noughties, you probably will like this track.

“Clockwork” tells the story of what feels like a battle with a mental illness with this lyric indicating the struggle; “I’ve had enough, I’ll rid the curse be normal again.” Metal is hard to not fall into the category of sounding all the same because of its aggresion and similar rhythmical guitar patterns, but Charlotte really draws you in to listen to the story. I feel that the repetition of this track makes it actually more original.

The fourth track on the album, “Time Wasted” is a bit more electronic to begin with, adding another influence into Crosslight’s inspirations. It’s a short song which adds strength to embark on the next song “Karma.” Now, this song is heavy and deals with angst from, well, karma. What goes around comes around honey, we’ve all gone through it, wherever we’re watching someone go through karma or going through it ourselves. I find that the song itself has the same attitude of shrugging your shoulders, it’s simply put as a care free nature of “Whatever!” The chorus lyrics aren’t quite the normal, metal lyrics you’d get, it’s more of an Avril Lavigne tone which is really different. “You run around oh so careless honey, karma’s gonna catch up soon, I’m done with you.” The rhythm is slightly different compared to the other tracks on the album, but it still has a similar vibe to it all. Strongest track on he album so far for me.

“Fighting for What? falls into the same attitude as everything else so far, and as a listener, I’m longing for another influence in the band’s music to make it slightly more original. The drums are so programmed which makes the song feel forced. I think the band were definitely aiming towards an angry, powerful album instead of the music actually being more felt, which is definitely not a negative thing, it’s just a personal preference. I really admire the band for striving for something and getting the product done the way they wanted it.

Overdriven bass played by Daniel begins the next song “Poison” which creates a tone that Chris Wolstenholme defines in Muse. I feel that the song doesn’t dynamically go anywhere, it stays the same throughout. I’d really like to hear Charlotte sing different phrases/tones to make the songs slightly more interesting, but saying that, I do like the angry attitude in her voice. At the very end of the song, it’s really interesting how everything just completely stops and there’s just a slightly delay that comes after from Charlotte’s voice making it sound confusing as if there’s more to come, but there’s not… clever.

“100,000 Miles” begins with a ukulele which was very unexpected seeing as the album is so angry. The song does have a rhythmical metal sounding guitar part by Luke come swiftly in after the first verse, making the band go back to their roots. I think the band tried to make this a folk-metal track with the soft string instruments sitting in the back, but it doesn’t work as well as planned I personally think. I’ve noticed that in most of the songs on the album, it feels very stiff and mixed to the grid making it sound somewhat robotic. This is used a-lot in heavy metal music as it does add more power to the songs.

A heavy prog-esque riff dominates “Submerge” and automatically I thought to myself “this is more like it.” The tone is scary and makes you instantly want to move in someway, wherever it may be a foot twitch or a head bang. The guitar tone sounds similar to the sound that Queens of the Stone Age implicated on Songs for the Deaf, which is always a great compliment. I like how the band bring their own flavouring to this prog based song. It’s definitely my favourite on the album for sure.

“Just a Kiss” features Amal Birch, a freestyle rap artist. The song definitely has an influence of what Jay Z captured with 99 Problems; the rap rock element. The rap itself from Amal feels a bit too fixed and I really wish it was a bit more loose. The words are really well thought out though and fit the topic well. With the programmed drums, it’s just not quite as powerful as this song should be. I could be completely wrong about the drums being programmed, but the mix sounds like they have been edited quite a lot. I’m sure this song live will be really great to listen to with drummer, Joe, laying down some juicy drum fills. I feel that the topic of the track is about simply having a kiss with someone in, maybe a club, well that’s what it sounds like.

Once again, the next song doesn’t really go anywhere, and sometimes when that happens, it doesn’t take me to a place. Whereas songs that have a strong momentum all the way through, it makes people shift to another place where they can really relate to the song. Saying that, in “B.A.C.K”, you can feel the energy that the band bring in their music, they really do live for this stuff. One thing that people look for in new bands are charisma, talent & passion, Crosslight certainly do have that.

The guitars in “Kingdom is Mine” aren’t quite quantised to the same tempo as the drums in some parts making the guitars sound unfinished and sort of out of time. This song is once again nu-metal down to a tee. I feel the influences behind this song are Halestorm and Evanescence with all three bands having a strong female vocal. I like the path that the band go down with their music but like I’ve said before, it’s not really my personal preference to listen too.

Next up is actually an acoustic number, Charlotte sings “Drive On” with an American twang making it show that her voice is versatile and can sing through genres. This folk number feels slightly forced still and the harsh drum editing is more obvious than before as this song is so soft. I feel that the cymbals being played, more a less constantly make the song sound a bit messy. Overall though, the song is sweet and is also the longest track on the whole album.

The last track on the album “I’m Not Done” isn’t really a stand out track as much as the last of an album should be. The song does cover the band’s genre as a whole and connects the songs altogether to fit a nice pattern for the album. If you’re a fan of My Chemical Romance, The Used, Tonight Alive, then you should definitely check Crosslight out.  The band cover a wide range of influences in their music and make them fresh. The songs are good and the talent shines. Interested to see where the band may take their music in their next releases…

Favourite Tracks: Recovery, Run Into Flowers, Clockwork, Time Wasted, Karma, Submerge.

Score: 6.5/10

https://www.facebook.com/crosslightband/

https://www.crosslight.band/

Meme Detroit & Institutes live at The Night Owl, Birmingham – 5th May 2018 (Review)

I went to see Meme Detroit with support from Institutes live on the 5th May at the Night Owl. I know both bands personally so it was nice to go and do a feature on both. Institutes brought their theatrical side out with the theme tune of the Avengers signalling their first track. Gareth’s vocals were constantly on point as each song progressed. I know Gaz personally, like I said, and I know how much he likes Star Wars, so I really wasn’t surprised to see a Star Wars mask on the stage while they played, just constantly staring into our souls. With their set featuring tracks like We See Colour which was aggressive, it was nice to hear tracks like Not Alone with the whole arrangement of the song being delicious. I must say, the bass line in the verses for this track is so fragile but delicate. Their stand out track for the show was Golden Egg with the lead guitar going through what seemed like a midi synthesiser pedal, the song had so much power. Top performance from the boys, will definitely be checking them out again for sure. 

34480242_2383468118333692_9127819532893683712_n.jpg

Whereas for Meme, the girl sure does bring attitude to every track the band plays. Meme released her debut album back in 2016 and has been causing quite a stir round the Birmingham music scene for quite a while. With influences drawn from 90’s grunge, 80’s synth pop and indie rock, Meme’s distorted music is big. Her live set included big songs “With You” featuring Love Transcends All Again, a real powerful love song about being in love with “love.” The band, of course, featured the latest release, Soc Med Junkies which is about social media as a whole and how it controls us. I must say, the songs are really quite good, but at the gig, some guitar parts were drowned so much in fuzz and distortion that it was hard to understand the songs fully. Saying that, the band as a whole (Barney Such on Drums) and Ross Adams on bass) created an energy that filled the whole room. Just a shame that I had to leave early.

I asked Meme some questions to get a better feel of what her music/influences involve.

“I was sat aimlessly scrolling one day through my news feeds and suddenly found myself feeling really heavy-hearted and down. I realised it was due to all the negative sh** that I was reading and watching on my screen. It was a bit of a light bulb, “what the f*** am I doing?” moment so I switched off my phone, grabbed my guitar and notebook and started writing to put my time to a much happier/more positive activity.”

 

“Thanks! Yeah, the 80s thing came from a composition briefing for a film soundtrack. I’d never really done anything like that before so decided to give it a go and ended up really liking what came out. So much so, we released it. Influence wise, it’s hard to say as my influences range from all sorts. Due to my family’s generational hand me down box of vinyls: Bands/artists such as The Beatles, Bowie, Bob Marley, MJ, Foo Fighters, to At the drive in, Radiohead, Smashing Pumpkins, Death from above. I’m well into dance and old skool hip hop also. If something stirs an emotion in me, whatever the genre, I’ll dig it. Guitar writing wise, however, I guess I could probably say my biggest influences are Radiohead’s Jonny Greenwood, Billy Corgan and although she’s a bassist, Pixies’ Kim Deal’s simplistic yet genius playing style inspired me from a very young age.”

 

What has been your favourite gig you’ve played so far? What’s the weirdest gig you’ve played?
“My favourite gig so far has to be when we played the main stage at Silverstone.
It was just an awesome buzzing atmosphere. The Sun was setting in the distance and in that moment as we were playing out, it just felt so right. It was almost like an out-of-body experience ha. The weirdest gig I’ve played is probably The Treehouse sessions in Birmingham. I wasn’t sure what to expect as when you get there, you have to go through someone’s house and you get taken into the back garden. You go through this wooden door at the bottom of the garden (it was like Narnia!) and suddenly you’re in this full on production room with monitor screens and crew everywhere. Then you get taken through to the performance area and it’s literally a tiny treehouse with a gorgeous intimate seating area & bar below for the audience. The whole thing was filmed for their channel with an interview that took place in this ace yurt. It actually ended up being more awesome than weird in the end!”

The Garage Flowers – Crashing The Party (Single Review)

London-based band, The Garage Flowers are a typical bad boy, dirty rock and roll band. The energy they create in their songs is unbelievable and reminds of what The Rolling Stones would have sounded like if they took their music down the slightly heavier guitar tone route. The Garage Flowers fan base is forever gaining with thousands of followers on their social media sites, and with their latest single, I’m not surprised. They’ve certainly gained a new fan in myself.

Crashing the Party is a real indie number that would definitely make anyone tap their foot too. The band have elements of brit pop in their music, and I can definitely hear Pulp in this song. It’s a fun, witty, indie number that will definitely go down well at any gig for sure. The catchy tune has got over a 1,500 views on YouTube in 2 months. The song was produced by Paul Tipler (The Horrors, Carl Barat, Squeeze), so no wonder the production is clear and features the essence of a great dance track. If you’re ever in the neck of the woods that The Garage Flowers are in, go crash their party and have a fun-filled night of laughter and music.

instagram.com/the_garage_flowers
facebook.com/thegarageflowersband



twitter.com/garageflowerss

Score: 3/5

Quill – Grey Goose Call (EP Review)

Quill are not only known for their unique musical style… they create a musical journey through the ages with their live set up. After listening to Grey Goose Call, it’s now a fact that they create the same energetic live essence throughout the studio recording. They sit comfortably within the celtic folk/rock genre and it’s safe to say, the latest line up have brought a fresh new sound to their music. With Grey Goose Call written by the band themselves, the 4 songs take us into a dark, but warming entrance to what feels like a new beginning.

The title track of the EP begins with a gentle goose calling, before strong harmonies that really remind of Fleetwood Mac’s tone’s enter. The band have adapted to their influences through time, but made sure their sound becomes so fresh to listen to. For a 6:12 minutes long song, it captivates you all the way through. As the song dynamically builds, the sound becomes quite diverse and intricate. The bass comfortably sits in the mix, but you can constantly hear the pulse repeating. I must say, the production is really intense and in your face with elements of Fairport Convention shining through. Having string instruments gives the song a complete different style. I personally feel if the strings weren’t in this track, it would sound more like a pop orientated track. Joy’s emotional vocals tell the story of simply hearing the “Grey Goose Call.” Maybe the goose is a symbolic structure of something? It could be a metaphor for a cry for help. In my opinion, the percussion and drums replicates the simplicity of the song, but by making it sound complex. The rhythm makes it sound kind of African and upbeat. This is a very strong song to set the bar quite high for what sounds like a warming welcome to the sound of Quill. The song ends just as it begins, indicating that yes, this is end, but it’s certainly not over yet.

“Elephant in the Room” begins with footsteps creeping up into a simple 4/4 beat. The guitars sound heavily influenced by old progressive rock tones, similar to bands like Genesis. Quill take a simple blues sounding song and subtle add tasty melodic guitar lines over the top, making it an extremely versatile song. The chorus is moody and has the ability to haunt anyone with the harmonies generating new, elegant parts throughout. An elephant in the room is a metaphor for an obvious problem in a room basically, and I really like how Quill can take a personal matter but make the problem not known. It leaves the audience asking “what is the actual problem?” Questioning an audience is a good thing in my opinion, because they are wanting to know more about your music, indicating them to keep on listening. I love how this song isn’t rushed and is played to indicate an emotion of love. When the instruments are all cut out to just the drums, it makes me feel that anything could happen next. The drums completely stop to just Joy singing “elephant in the room” which end with a subtle breath like sigh making the audience realise that after all this time, the actual problem and the elephant in the room, was simply the singer.

The subtly comes through this song with Joy’s vocals sounding exceptionally emotional. Having someone’s affection is the most warming feeling in the world and I really like how Quill have managed to replicate this feeling through “Skin on Skin.” This song is moody in the essence that it really grips you to hold onto every part of the song. All of the members of Quill have had a memorable history in music and I really like how they bring all their stories into one, creating a really big influence to their fans. This song would really be a lovely wedding dance for a couple, as the comfort of the song is so calming. There’s genuinely no negativity shining in this song, making it really a big moment on the EP. Dynamically, the song doesn’t build as much as the others on the EP, but it works so well to keep such a calming momentum.

The last track on the EP is a fist pump for wanting love. The whole EP is situated round love and the different aspects that you want. We have Skin on Skin which is the comfort of affection, whereas the vibe I’m getting from “Little Affection” is needing to be loved. It’s the longest track on the EP and it constantly builds with influences of world music being mirrored constantly. The rhythm of the song just makes you tap your feet and really dive into the music. “I forgotten what it felt like to fall in love” takes us into a new element of the song; really needing this love otherwise things could fall apart. I personally feel that the singer is needing this love to carry on, it’s her well-being and soul on the line, if she doesn’t get this love, something bad could happen. It makes me think; what is she actually in love with? could it be being in love with the meaning of love? a friend? a piece of music? It could be anything, which makes me like this a whole lot more. The sense of not knowing what the topic is throughout the EP makes me drawn to Quill’s music more. We never really know what the actual concept Joy is singing about which is great, we’re just left with the topic of love. This track is one that the whole band wrote together which strangely enough, makes the song so much bigger than the others on the track. It’s definitely the stand out, rock ballad of the EP. It’s proggy in the aspect that the concept is here, there and everywhere.

As a whole, the EP is truly wonderful. I’m lucky enough to be supporting Quill on the 8th June at the Artrix Theatre in Bromsgrove.

The musicians on the album consist of Joy Strachan-Brain on vocals, Kate McWilliam on violin and backing vocals, Abby Brant on keyboards and backing vocals, Tony Kelsey on guitars and backing vocals, Matt Worley on bass and backing vocals, Andy Edwards on the drums and the ELO legend, Bev Bevan on percussion… we now realise the secret behind Quill’s full sound, the extremely talented musicians behind the songs. 

Favourite Tracks: Elephant in the Room, Skin on Skin, Little Affection
Score: 7.5/10

https://quillbanduk.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/quilluk/
http://www.quilluk.com/